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Time for Baseball

The baseball season started a few minutes ago with Atlanta playing Philadelphia.  I’ve been working with Major League Baseball for more than a dozen years, and my (along with partners, of course) company, The Sports Scheduling Group, produces the schedules for MLB (our chief scheduler Kelly Easton does all the hard work, but I do the final day assignments), as well as for the umpires (which I do, based on some fantastic work done a few years ago in a Tepper School  MBA project, further developed in Hakan Yildiz‘ dissertation).  The start of the season is always a time of anxiety for me (not strong anxiety, but a gnawing fear):  what if I forgot to put in a game?  What if Philadelphia shows up tonight, but Atlanta’s schedule has them in Los Angeles?  It is a rather silly worry, since thousands have people have looked at the schedule at this point, so it is unlikely that anything particularly egregious is happening.

Still, I was happy tonight to see Brett Myers toss the first pitch to Kelly Johnson (a ball).

And know that he did so because of operations research.

{ 2 } Comments

  1. Marina | April 6, 2009 at 8:22 pm | Permalink

    On this subject – I have been wondering, as the Midwest is digging out of half a foot of snow today, is there a deliberate attempt made to schedule early April games is warmer climates or in domes?

  2. Michael Trick | April 6, 2009 at 9:21 pm | Permalink

    Nope. Fairness and other issues get in the way of that. And let’s see where the snowstorm is next week (since no team wants to begin the season with 2 weeks on the road).

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  1. […] mathematical models. Say, are you a baseball fan?” where I hope to squeeze in a story about operations research and sports scheduling. I’m hoping for a better line through the answers at OR-Exchange. Posted by Michael Trick […]