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{ Monthly Archives } November 2012

Referees considered harmful

When doing empirical work, researchers often mess up either in the design of the experiment or in the analysis of data.  In operations research, much of our “empirical work” is in computational testing of algorithms.  Is algorithm A faster than algorithm B?  “It depends” is generally the only honest answer.  It depends on the instance […]

Operations Research and a Baseball Job

Analytics is getting to be more and more important in sports, and sports teams and leagues are looking to people with analytical skills to fill key roles in their organizations.   The MIT Sports Analytics conference is a big deal, attracting more than 2000 attendees, with an active job placement service.  The MBAs at my […]

The cutting plane method for matching is polynomial

Michael Mitzenmacher is a computer scientist at Harvard with a blog My Biased Coin.  As you might expect from the title, Michael works in the area of randomized algorithms, and even has a book on the subject.  His blog is an extremely useful guide to the what is happening in algorithms in CS (and what […]

Optimizing Angry Birds

Most operations research competitions look at problems that are, frankly, dull.  At least to the non-OR-connoisseur.   Whether it is optimizing computer usage, nurse scheduling,  financial portfolio creation, or rescheduling airplanes, there is a certain utilitarianism about operations research competitions.  There are some competitions that have some level of charm (predicting murders in Philadelphia perhaps). […]